Category Archives: U.S. Fulbright

Miss the Last Fulbright-Clinton Fellowship Webinar? We’ve Got the Recorded Version Right Here.

Working on a Fulbright-Clinton Fellowship application and missed the last webinar? No worries. Check out the recorded version right here:

Fulbright-Clinton Meet a Fellow Webinar from Fulbright Program on Vimeo.

Also, be sure to tune in and attend the next Fulbright-Clinton webinar on finalizing your application this Thursday, September 18 at 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EST. For more information and to learn how to sign up, click here.

Preparing for a Bauhaus-Filled Year in Germany

By Meghan Forbes, 2014-2015, Germany

Meghan Forbes

Meghan Forbes, 2014-2015, Germany, taking a lunch break by the waters of the Tiergarten

This September, I will be trading Ann Arbor, Michigan’s autumnal canopy of maples for the bicycles, parks, and museums of Berlin, Germany. On a Fulbright grant, I will be in Berlin to further my Ph.D. dissertation research, which contends the role of the Czech avant-garde is a significant yet overlooked link in the vast network of exchange that existed across various European centers of art making in the interwar period.

My research centers around the Bauhaus, a modernist school of art and architecture based originally in Weimar and then in Dessau in the period between the two World Wars. Although its unique pedagogy, functionalist aesthetic, and transnational influence have been documented, there is an absence in scholarly literature regarding the dynamic relationship between the school’s major figures in Germany and their peers in then Czechoslovakia. I aim to fill this gap by mapping the influence of the Bauhaus eastward and reciprocally, the influence of the Bauhaus’ eastern neighbor on the school’s aesthetic ethos.The implications of this revised telling are especially pertinent as the humanities move towards a more interdisciplinary approach, by encouraging a shift in historical narratives that sees multiple centers where once only one was perceived.

A large portion of my research will be in cooperation with the Berlinische Galerie and the Bauhaus and Werkbund archives. From these sources, I will be looking for correspondence and other documents that show a particular Czech influence on the German Bauhaus – for example, in theory and practice corresponding to typographic design.

Back at School and Working on a Fulbright Application? Contact a Fulbright Alumni Ambassador.

2014 Fulbright AAs

(Back row, left to right) Kelly Rivera, Diana Heise, Cameron Kruse, MaSovaida Morgan, Paul Bostrom, Lauren Gaydosh, Carlos Rivas, Samuel Gordon, Giuseppe Cespedes, Jacob Vidourek, Sharief El-Gabri, Rebecca Littman-Smith, Alexis Schmidt, Janice Feng, Kia Hall; (front row, left to right), Mario Hoang Nguyen, Alyssa Meyer, Kevin Fomalont, A. Hameto Benkreira, Michael Young; (not pictured) Arienne Jones

Have you been working on a Fulbright U.S. Student Program application this summer and have questions, now that you’re back at school? If you’re enrolled in an institution or a recent graduate, you’ve probably been working closely with your Fulbright Program Adviser and Fulbright World Area Managers.

Fulbright Alumni Ambassadors are another terrific resource available to anyone thinking of applying or currently engaged in the application process.

The Fulbright Alumni Ambassador Program was established in 2008 to identify, train and engage a select group of approximately 15 Fulbright U.S. Student Program alumni to serve as representatives, recruiters, and spokespeople for the Fulbright Program. The Program was expanded to include U.S. Scholar Program alumni in 2009.

Fulbright Alumni Ambassadors are selected annually through recommendations from Fulbright Commissions and U.S. Embassy staff, partner organizations, and approved by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

To learn more about the 2014 cohort of Fulbright Alumni Ambassadors, and to contact them directly, click here.

Good luck to all Fulbright applicants!

The Fulbright Alumni Ambassador Program was established in 2008 to identify, train and engage a select group of approximately 15 Fulbright U.S. Student Program alumni to serve as representatives, recruiters, and spokespeople for the Fulbright Program. The Program was expanded to include U.S. Scholar Program alumni in 2009.

Fulbright Alumni Ambassadors are selected annually through recommendations from Fulbright Commissions and U.S. Embassy staff, partner organizations, and approved by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

- See more at: http://eca.state.gov/fulbright/fulbright-alumni/alumni-ambassadors#sthash.epxNa862.dpuf

 

The Fulbright Alumni Ambassador Program was established in 2008 to identify, train and engage a select group of approximately 15 Fulbright U.S. Student Program alumni to serve as representatives, recruiters, and spokespeople for the Fulbright Program. The Program was expanded to include U.S. Scholar Program alumni in 2009.

Fulbright Alumni Ambassadors are selected annually through recommendations from Fulbright Commissions and U.S. Embassy staff, partner organizations, and approved by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

- See more at: http://eca.state.gov/fulbright/fulbright-alumni/alumni-ambassadors#sthash.epxNa862.dpuf

The Fulbright Alumni Ambassador Program was established in 2008 to identify, train and engage a select group of approximately 15 Fulbright U.S. Student Program alumni to serve as representatives, recruiters, and spokespeople for the Fulbright Program. The Program was expanded to include U.S. Scholar Program alumni in 2009.

Fulbright Alumni Ambassadors are selected annually through recommendations from Fulbright Commissions and U.S. Embassy staff, partner organizations, and approved by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

- See more at: http://eca.state.gov/fulbright/fulbright-alumni/alumni-ambassadors#sthash.epxNa862.dpuf

 

The Fingerprints of a Fulbright Student

By Cameron Kruse, 2012-2013, India

Cameron Kruse - 1

Cameron Kruse, 2012-2013, India (left), with fellow Fulbrighters Amruta Sarma, Ajit Rajiva, and Sabrina Dek surviving in the great Rann of Kutch

I wearily push my way through the crowd stepping around a cow as I approach the chai stand. I yell over the noise of the street “Dean masala chai baia,” which means, “three spiced chais please, brother,” in Gujarati. He expertly pours out three cups of chai as I wipe the unrelenting sweat from my brow. I grasp three small, dirty, chipped cups of chai welcoming the burning sensation on my fingers as it snaps me out of the lethargy induced by a losing battle against heat exhaustion; I spent the morning fruitlessly trying to determine the efficacy of medicinal plant extracts in a room far exceeding the ambient temperature of 120 ºF. Walking back to my colleagues, I distribute the cups. We stand sipping our chai as I address the ever-present curious onlookers in broken Gujarati: “My name is Brother Cameron. I am from the United States. I am here to study medicine from the drumstick plant. I am a Fulbrighter.”

At the risk of a third degree sunburn, I stand in the sun and allow my mind to drift back to when I was finishing my bachelor’s degree at Pepperdine University, trying to join the Fulbright family on a grant to India. I poured myself into countless drafts of my application, attempting to convey how I would leave my fingerprint on the world of medicinal plant science while engaging with my local host community. Look at me now, standing in the middle of the street, leaving my grimy fingerprint on a cup of chai, vainly trying to maintain forward progress on my research.

Architecture amidst the Trees in Helsinki

By Rebecca Littman-Smith 2010-2011, Finland

Rebecca Littman-Smith - 1

Rebecca Littman-Smith, 2010-2011, Finland

In a landscape of trees, the fields appear like islands, providing intermittent view corridors while riding the train from Helsinki to Turku. The trees are prevalent, dominating the Finnish countryside both in nature and in the built environment. Birch, pine and spruce trees are harvested and employed in a variety of ways. Timber is part of Finnish identity, from the forests that thrive in the Nordic climate, to the tradition of building a summer cottage within the landscape.

My Fulbright U.S. Student Program grant took me to Helsinki, Finland to study the use of wood in Finnish Architecture. As a material to use in the construction of buildings, timber is unique. Timber breathes, it feels warm to the touch, it shrinks and expands and preserves the organic qualities that give it a connection to life. In the words of Juhani Pallasmaa, Finnish Architect and scholar: “Wood speaks of its two existences and time scales; its first life as a growing tree and the second as a human artifact made by the caring hand of a carpenter or cabinetmaker.”