Communities and Rivers in the State Named After the “Great River”

In a local farmers market, colorful t-shirts hang from hooks proudly proclaiming, in the words of William Faulkner, “To understand the world, you have to understand a place like Mississippi.” As a More »

Fulbright Wins a Silver Telly Award!

The Fulbright Program has been awarded a Silver Telly Award for our short film “My Fulbright Life: Brian Rutenberg”! We’re excited that the story of cultural exchange is being heard far and More »

Bridging the Atlantic through Traditional East African Dance and Music

My journey to New York University (NYU) to pursue graduate training in dance education started when I was still young. My artistic creativity, performance dexterity and exposure to dance artistry were nurtured More »

Expecting the Unexpected–Cosmic Ray Physics in Argentina

As a physicist, I study cosmic rays—high-energy particles that zip around the universe. If scientists are lucky, these cosmic rays land on detectors set up on the ground. For my Fulbright grant, More »

Home on the Steppe: My Fulbright in Mongolia

I know there was a time when Mongolia didn’t feel like another home, before I went there on my Fulbright grant, before 2006. But I can’t remember it. Every time I speak More »

 

Don’t Forget Us

By Spencer Reece, 2012-2013, Honduras

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Spencer Reece, 2012-2013, Honduras, with the girls from Our Little Roses Orphanage

I taught, ate, laughed, and wept with seventy-two orphaned girls for one year on the grounds of Our Little Roses, the only all-girl orphanage in Honduras, one of the poorest Spanish-speaking countries in the Western hemisphere and home to some 250,000 orphans. The Fulbright year I lived there, 24,000 orphans tried to cross the Rio Grande in search of their parents or in search of work or in search of both; the year I left the number more than doubled to 50,000.

I lived with the girls in San Pedro Sula, dubbed by most journalists as the murder capital of the world. Roughly three people a day are killed in San Pedro, most of it gang-related. Behind ten-foot walls and armed guards, I came, with the aid of a Fulbright grant in Creative Writing, to teach the girls how to write poems. The idea had come to me on a previous visit to the orphanage when one girl had said to me on my final night: “Don’t forget us.” She might have said that to everyone that passed through there. But with me, it stuck.

Fun with Microscopic Living Creatures on Fulbright

By Seanghuoy Ho, 2012-2014, Cambodia

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Seanghuoy Ho, 2012-2014, Cambodia examining antibacterial compounds’ efficacy against the bacterial community known as “biofilm” in the laboratory at the Waksman Institute of Microbiology, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey

When I was a little girl, I once watched a science program on TV in which I saw people wearing long white coats and goggles, holding long, round tubes. The tubes contained cloudy solutions and the people were viewing these solutions under machines called microscopes. I learned from that TV show that those solutions contained bacteria and that they were living creatures. Bacteria come in different shapes and colors, and need food, oxygen and specific temperatures in order to survive. As a kid, I was excited to learn more about these tiny creatures, even though at that time, I had no clue as to why people would want to study them. I dreamed about becoming a scientist one day and conducting research on these wonderful, tiny living things.

Now, thanks to a Fulbright Foreign Student grant, I am a master’s degree student in microbiology at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Since my childhood, I’ve learned a great deal about microbes, specifically bacteria. I realize that I mostly saw bacteria on TV when they caused an outbreak. The majority of bacteria, however, are harmless and even beneficial to human beings. Antibiotics, chemical compounds produced by particular bacteria and used to treat many diseases, are one typical example of their benefits.

Fulbright Program Advisers Attend Fall Development Initiative

Fulbright in Motion: Week of December 1 - 5

Fulbright Program Advisers attending the fall initiative (left to right): Juan Arriata, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras; Alina Choo, Suffolk University; Karen Wachsmuth, University of Iowa; Anne Marsh, Bridgewater College; Stephen Mead, Saint Martin's University; and Laura Clippard, Middle Tennessee State University (not pictured: Catherine Baxter, Central Methodist University, Shirley Eoff, Angelo State University, Timothy Nixon, Shepherd University, and Sara Otis, University of Hawaii at Manoa).

Fulbright Program Advisers attending the fall initiative (left to right): Juan Arriata, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras; Alina Choo, Suffolk University; Karen Wachsmuth, University of Iowa; Anne Marsh, Bridgewater College; Stephen Mead, Saint Martin’s University; and Laura Clippard, Middle Tennessee State University (not pictured: Catherine Baxter, Central Methodist University, Shirley Eoff, Angelo State University, Timothy Nixon, Shepherd University, and Sara Otis, University of Hawaii at Manoa).

New York, New York:

Select Fulbright Program Advisers participated in workshops at the Institute of International Education (IIE) as part of the Fulbright Program Adviser (FPA) Development Initiative, a bi-annual event designed to help diversify which institutions participate in the Fulbright and other U.S. Department of State sponsored programs.

Each spring, approximately 10-15 institutions that have not recently been active or participated with the Fulbright Program are selected by competitive application in an effort to inform them of international exchange opportunities that they may not be aware of, and to assist them with developing their own “Fulbright culture” on their respective campuses.

Notes on Norway

By Paul Bostrom, 2012-2013, Norway

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Paul Bostrom, 2012-2013, Norway, enjoying an early afternoon sunset in Norway’s arctic Tromsø

I thought of myself as an unconventional candidate for a Fulbright grant. After all, I was in my late twenties and only a part-time graduate student. But I thought of myself as curious person with a deep appreciation for travel – a hardworking student, with a genuine interest in better understanding my own Scandinavian heritage. As I’ve come to learn, there is no “conventional” Fulbright candidate.

My Fulbright application was designed around a “Capstone research project,” the final requirement of my graduate program. My study focused on the market effects of Norway’s energy rating scheme for buildings (read: energy efficiency report card for your home), and I was fortunate to have secured an affiliation with the University of Oslo’s Center for Development and the Environment. The Center has a strong reputation for its research – equally important; it has a long history of assembling international perspectives on pressing environmental issues.

I recall my first dinner at a colleague’s home, about three weeks into my stay. I arrived at a small apartment situated about 10 kilometers north of Oslo. It was a cool September evening, and dusk was just settling in over the city.

It’s a #FulbrightThanksgiving!

Fulbright in Motion: Week of November 24 - 28

Our Fulbright Program recap for last week highlights all the festive Fulbright Thanksgiving meals that occurred around the world! Thanks for sharing your #FulbrightThanksgiving moments with us!